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How To Survive An Adolescent Beagle Puppy

adolescent beagle puppy

Thank you for visiting. It's been great to get your comments. Today we are going to look at how you can survive an adolescent Beagle puppy.

You're six months in and, just when you thought that your new little associate was comfortably settled and had stopped chewing everything in sight, you begin to notice some rather alarming changes in his behavior.

Your adolescent Beagle puppy has begun to display signs that he' s developing a mind of his own.

So far he has been a very good dog rarely straying from your side and coming when you call. Now, he's a teenager he' s become more confident, straying a little farther away in the park. When you call he's taking his own sweet time to come back.

He may be becoming progressively intolerant of everyone except a small circle of intimate friends.

At four months your Beagle puppy was greeting people with wiggles and wags but by six months he backs away snaps and lunges with hackles raised.

It’s as though someone turned on a switch in your doggy' s brain, and now you have a confused unpredictable and badly behaved adolescent Beagle puppy on your hands.

This Is Not the Time To Panic

Even when you're being sorely tested it's important to remain. Be calm and patient when correcting him and keep your house rules consistent. Make sure your dog knows you love him, no matter what.

He's not headed for the juvenile courts, he's not a born rebel or a hopeless case. He's a teenager! Your puppy is just learning how to live in our world. 

Things are going to improve if you work with your rebellious little teenager. I can assure you they will become worse if you don’t. Ignore his education now and you will find yourself living with an under-socialized, badly-mannered, hyperactive animal.

If you make the effort, the relationship you can build with your dog is unmatched. A good parent will be able to mold their dog into a confident, happy family member … a companion for the next 10 to 15 years.


How To Get Your Adolescent Beagle Puppy To Listen Again

adolescent beagle puppy

If your adolescent dog has been with you since puppy-hood you’ve had several months to get to know one another and to build a bond. That’s going to help.

When your Beagle is distracted, it means you must work harder to engage your dog.

Try to be interesting and fun so that your dog actually wants to listen. Beagles love new experiences, so find playful ways to keep him engaged. Understand your adolescent Beagle puppy's point of view and try to find games and experiences that will appeal to his natural instincts.

Your Adolescent Dog Will Develop A Different Sleeping Schedule

Your Beagle puppy spent more time asleep than awake. Those days have gone. Your adolescent Beagle puppy now has an endless supply of energy! He may snooze on the sofa the entire evening, and just when you’re ready to call it a night he’s wide awake and wants to party!

There’s not much you can do to convince him to settle down but don’t panic. These shenanigans will come and go, and all that’s needed is a little patience. In time this will pass.

Socializing Your Adolescent Beagle Puppy Is Important!

adolescent beagle puppy

These are My Beagle Pals

You’ve done an excellent job socializing your puppy, but it shouldn’t stop now that he's a teenager.

It' s important to continue to carefully expose him to different people, places, other dogs, and new situations like riding with you in the car. Your dog may suddenly become wary of situations he previously had no issue with. This is quite normal.

So, don’t push or try to get him to “confront his fear,” and don’t admonish him for what may look like unruly behavior. 

Beagles are a hunting breed and they love smelling, Use a sniffing game. I suggest that you use lots of short, fun training sessions and brain games. Don't rely solely on physical exercise to tire him out.

Beagles are genetically predisposed to explore! These dogs love to wander further from the nest and explore new places. I recommend that you keep him on his leash, unless you’re in a fenced off area.

When he's off the leash keep practicing calling him back and reward him with a tasty treat every time he comes.

Give him a little while to process whatever has spooked him. If he wants to pull away to avoid the scary thing, that’s okay. He may bark and that’s fine.

It' s unrealistic to expect your adolescent Beagle puppy to be best friends with every dog. Dogs tend to have special friends, casual acquaintances and peopled they don’t particularly like.

It's quite natural for male dogs to squabble. With teenage dogs scraps, arguments, and even play-fighting can seem all too real.

It's common for adolescent males, to posture, growl, stare, snap and snarl. Given time and continued socialization, an adolescent dog will normally develop confidence and no longer feel the need to continually prove himself.

Don’t wait for your little guy to get into a fight before you let him know you won't tolerate it. Make a habit of praising and rewarding him whenever he greets another dog in a friendly fashion.

Some Ideas To Keep Your Daily Life Running Smoothly

Temptations such as open doors, chewy shoes, or unattended meals can be impossible for your teen rebel to ignore.

Set up a regular daily routine, and stick to it as closely as possible

If you change the rules as you go along, or when every member of the family has a different interpretation of them, your teenage rebel will be confused, and the confusion will cause him to be anxious. Beagle pups crave routine and predictability, it keeps them feeling safe and secure.

Until you’re sure they understand and respect your rules and boundaries, you will need to manage their environment to keep your dog and your belongings safe.

It may seem as though your little dog has forgotten all of his training. Don’t worry – he hasn’t. He’s simply having difficulty accessing all that knowledge right now. This will return to normal when he’s done with the teenage phase.

I have found that an excellent way to prevent household problems, such as excessive howling destructive chewing, boredom, or stress, and anxiety is to stuff my dog’s daily diet of kibble into a few treat dispensing toys.

'Leave It!' is a command every dog should know. It helps prevent resource guarding behavior by teaching him that he must give-up any object when you tell him to.

Correct your dog firmly, but fairly. Never shout, smack or scare him. Once he's been reprimanded, move on and don't bear a grudge. Just try to remember that teenage puppy behavior is simply your dog's way of showing how independent and grown-up he is..... it's a natural instinct to act this way.

Please share your experiences with your Beagle puppy in the comments section below this post. I would love to hear from you...

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